Engineered Biosystems Building Reaches Private Funding Goal

Vertical photo of the building with sky

Naming opportunity remains available for signature facility

Momentum is building in dramatic fashion for support of the Engineered Biosystems Building (EBB), which has been completed. Following on the heels of an anonymous $8.5 million commitment made in the summer of 2014, an anonymous donor, along with Georgia Tech's research and innovation partner in pediatrics — Children's Healthcare of Atlanta — has made EBB a philanthropic success. These three commitments to the $113 million project bring the facility's private funding total to its Campaign goal of $34 million. State appropriations provided $64 million, with Institute funds providing $15 million.

"Children's will have a significant presence in EBB and throughout the Georgia Tech campus as we grow this partnership and together transform health care for children," said President G.P. "Bud" Peterson. "The facility will integrate biosciences, bioengineering, and biotechnology with the goal of dramatically improving the human condition. These donors are giving the gift of hope on a grand scale."

Comprising 200,000 square feet of advanced research space, the Engineered Biosystems Building has been designed around the concept of "research neighborhoods," each with a specific focus, bringing together faculty from a variety of disciplines to share not only laboratories but also common spaces that will nurture the informal collaborations and conversations that can lead to new ideas and solutions.

"Disease is not simple," said Paul Goldbart, dean of the College of Sciences. "To understand it and to redress it, we must quantify, analyze, and manipulate the cellular logic of life. The research neighborhoods have been designed and programmed to facilitate this vision. The fundamental discoveries made through the collaborations that will occur in EBB will lead to new insights that will ultimately help save lives."

Construction has been completed, with a formal dedication planned for early fall.